Equity And Inclusion

Ultimate Victoria is passionately committed to providing an inclusive, healthy and active community through the sport of Ultimate.

We trust that our clubs and volunteers always have the best intentions of create safe and welcoming environments at the grassroots level of the sport.

This section of our website outlines our ongoing efforts as an organisation and offers practical resources for clubs and volunteers to further equal opportunity and representation for all who want to be a part of our sport.


  • Gender Equity Commitment
  • Transgender Inclusitivy – Frequently Asked Questions

    Our Approach

    Other ultimate organisations have developed policies to incorporate transgender players. WFDF’s policy focuses on hormonal treatments and medical tests for evaluation. Given the recreational and community-based nature of our league, we have taken a different approach.

    We hold that each individual is an expert in their own identity and that each individual ought to be empowered to identify, label and define themselves in ways that are healthiest and happiest for them.

    Players in UV events and leagues are able to choose how they participate based on their gender identity at that time, regardless of sex characteristics or where they may be in any transition between genders. We trust and will rely on Spirit of the Game to avoid any abuse of this approach by a player merely to gain a competitive advantage on the field.

    Player eligibility

    Players are allowed to participate in any Ultimate Victoria event in accordance with their gender identity. This is irrespective of the player’s legal sex classification. Ultimate Victoria recognises that gender affirmation can be diverse and that each person’s gender affirmation journey is different. As such, medical or surgical intervention is not required, and players will not be asked to undergo medical examination for the purposes of gender verification.

    League Play

    Ultimate Central features that previously referred to Gender now use Gender Matchup. These features now group players by the gender they are comfortable matching against, as opposed to their gender identity. This solution allows us to recognise and welcome players who do not identify as one of the two binary genders, while also allowing the gender matching process during mixed gender games to be manageable.

    On the field, we expect little difference in how games would work without these changes. Gender balance rules currently in use at leagues determine how many women-matching and men-matching can take the field. Captains can resolve any uncertainty about Gender Matches as they sometimes do already. Overall, we want people to participate equally in the sport and to play it safely and enjoyably, and we trust UV members to make good decisions.

    If questions arise about what to do, teams can use Spirit of the Game and/or the Captain’s Clause to resolve it at that time, and Captains can let us know afterwards what occurred so that we can update our guidelines, if needed.

    FAQ

    As part of our mission statement, we aim to spread ultimate by being inclusive to people of all ages, genders and abilities. Our sport has historically operated only on the gender binary – for example, we asked people to register as either a man or woman, and we talked about 4 men and 3 women on the field. This model excludes transgender and non-binary people. To be an inclusive organisation and sport, it became clear that we needed to make some changes to our policies and language around gender.

    1. What language should we use?

    We differentiate between an individual’s gender identity and terms to help players match against each other on the field.

    On this website we try to avoid gender binary language and instead use players or people. When we mention men, we refer to self-identified men, non-binary, and trans-masculine folk; when we mention women, we include self-identified women, non-binary, trans-femme folk. On pages where we do that, we start by reminding members of these definitions.

    For play on the field, we use “men-matching” to indicate players who, based on their gender identity are most comfortable matching up against men, and “women-matching” to indicate players who are most comfortable matching up against women.

    We use women and men which refers to gender, instead of male and female, which refers to sex.

    Sharing your pronouns at the start of a season or event with a new team will help you determine what language to use. This is also a great way to recognize gender identity as non-binary and that trans players are welcome. There are many different terms for gender identity: see the glossary page for more terms.

    2. What do we do if we aren’t sure who to match against when on the field at the start of a point?

    If you aren’t sure what the other team’s gender-matches are, show your gender matching signals and call out ‘Gender Match!’ The other team will respond by indicating their gender matches with the relevant WFDF hand signals. 

    3. How will these changes impact our games?

    On the field, we expect little difference in how games work without these changes. With the Gender Balance rule, one endzone picks the gender ratio, and the other team matches. If you are uncertain as to what the other team’s gender matches are, show your gender matching signals and call ‘Gender Match’, as outlined in question 3.

    4. What is there is a situation at the field related to gender identity, such as someone taking advantage of the changes?

    Overall, we want people to participate equally in the sport and to play it safely and enjoyably, and we trust UV members to make good decisions. We don’t believe that UV members will abuse these changes to gain a competitive advantage, which would be highly unspirited. If there is an incident or questions arise about what to do, teams can use Spirit of the Game and/or the Captain’s Clause to resolve it at that time. Additionally, we ask that Captains can let us know afterwards what occurred so that we can address the incident or update our guidelines, if needed.

    5. How can we avoid getting someone’s gender wrong?

    When matching the other team, if you aren’t sure about the gender matches, signal your team’s gender matches and call ‘Gender Match’, as outlined in question 3.

    Developing an understanding and awareness about gender is new for many of us. Whenever we are learning something new, there’s a good chance we will make some mistakes! Be open to learning and contact us with questions if you aren’t sure about what to say or do in a given situation.

    6. Do we have to identify our non-binary players to the other team at the start of the game?

    No, it’s up to each individual to out themselves so please don’t out any players on your team unless they have agreed to this. Use the gender matching signals outlined in question 3 to identify which players are matching against which genders.

    7. What can I do to be more gender inclusive?

    Be open. This is a learning process. Become more aware of when you and others use gendered language. For example, say “match D” instead of “man D”, say “Hi everyone” or “Hi folks” instead of “Hi guys”.

    Trans people go by the pronouns they are most comfortable with. This can change over time as they explore their identity or depending on the identity they feel at the time. If you are talking with or about a trans person, be aware of and use their preferred pronouns. If you aren’t sure what pronouns they use, you can ask.

    8. If I am a man who is a beginner and more comfortable playing against women, am I allowed to say “matching against women”?

    The question we ask is “Based on your gender identity, who are you most comfortable matching up against?” Therefore you should choose what gender to match up against only based on you gender identity. The way it tends to work on the field is that beginner cisgender players tend to match other beginner cisgender players.

    9. If I am a woman competitive player who would like to match against men, can I indicate that?

    The question we ask is “Based on your gender identity, who are you most comfortable matching up against?” Therefore you should choose what gender to match up against only based on you gender identity. 

    10. What if I or someone on my team isn’t comfortable matching against someone that is significantly stronger or faster than they are because of their gender identity?

    We ask that you view this situation the same as you would if you or your teammate were matching up against a stronger cisgender player. As a team, you can make adjustments such as switching matchups, playing zone defense, or adjusting how you mark up against that player.

    Keep in mind that trans players are seeking to be able to express their gender identity, not gain a competitive advantage over you. While playing ultimate, you’ll sometimes match up against players that are stronger or weaker players than you. As more trans players join ultimate, you’ll also match up against trans players who are stronger or weaker players than you.

    11. The changes don’t go far enough because they still reinforce the gender binary. Why is this?

    We seek to create space for trans individuals to feel welcome and accepted but we admit that we don’t have the perfect solution. We review our changes on a regular basis to understand how they are working, especially from the perspective of trans members.


    Ultimate Victoria acknowledges the support of Proud 2 Play in developing this resource.

    UV is a member of the Rainbow Sporting Alliance.

    Thank you also to Vancouver Ultimate League for their assistance in developing this resource.

  • Neurodiversity is an acknowledgement that there are differences in the way people’s brains can work – there isno “correct” way. Part of this acknowledgement is that people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attentiondeficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or learning disorders such as dyslexia have varying methods of processing and understanding new information.

    As a coach it is important to remember that neurodiverse people taking part in Ultimate want to be there andwant to play just as much as the rest of the group. However, they may process your instructions differently fromthe rest of the group which can sometimes lead to frustration and impatience.

    Adapting your coaching style for neurodiverse participants not only helps them with processing andunderstanding, but it can also lead to clearer understanding for neurotypical participants as well.

     

    Download our guide to Coaching Neurodiverse Athletes to learn how you can adapt learning and playing at your club or team easier for neurodiverse players.

    UV - Coaching Neurodiverse Athletes